Posts Tagged "iron man"

Captain America – Recruiting for a Civil War

Posted by on Nov 2, 2014 in Comic Art News | 0 comments

Civil WarCaptain America – Recruiting for a Civil War by Jerry Whitworth

 

Recently Marvel Studios announced films slated for its third phase including solo movies for Doctor Strange, Black Panther, and Captain Marvel (featuring former Ms. Marvel Carol Danvers). Aligning with this news is the release of a trailer and sneak peek for the upcoming Avengers: Age of Ultron which, rumor has it, will feature a new team of Avengers to rise from its finale. It’s challenging to distinguish what out of all of this news and rumors has the most buzz, but perhaps the most inquired aspect of this information is the details of the announced Captain America: Civil War. Thus far, we know elements of the Civil War crossover will be adapted putting Captain America and Iron Man at odds while Black Panther will make his first appearance in costume in the film. However, the question several fans have posed is if there exists enough established characters in the Marvel Cinematic Universe to support such an ambitious project.

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Iron Man 3: From Page to Screen

Posted by on Jun 8, 2012 in Comic Art News | 2 comments

Iron Man and War Machine

Iron Man and War Machine

Iron Man 3: From Page to Screen by Jerry Whitworth

Little is known about the third Iron Man film save that it will in some manner adopt Warren Ellis’ Iron Man: Extremis storyline and that several key characters have been cast for it. In the last film, Tony Stark refused to share his armor designs with the United States government claiming modern technology would take some time yet to catch up to the ability to uncover the secrets of his technology, knowing its design would be safe with him and not the latest weapon the various nations of the world would use against each other. This all changed when Ivan Vanko appeared publicly battling Stark using the same repulsor technology prompting Stark to allow friend and Air Force liaison James Rhodes to abscond with a suit of armor amidst what appeared a drunken brawl between the Iron Men. Outfitted with this new armor with additional armaments provided by Justin Hammer, Rhodes and Stark defeated Vanko (in his own suit of armor) and repulsor-powered robot drones.

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Top 10: Avengers Members

Posted by on May 12, 2012 in Comic Art News | 11 comments

Top 10: Avengers Members by Jerry Whitworth

 

Avengers by George Perez

Avengers by George Perez

The Avengers are Marvel Comics’ premier team of heroes (though the X-Men and Fantastic Four could also meet criteria for this claim, with the idea in mind several from both groups have been members of the Avengers) combining together the best of the society of super-heroes that protect Earth from alien invasions, the folly of man’s science, mystical threats from beyond, and evil given birth upon Earth itself. Threats like the Kree, Skrull, Ultron, Kang, Dr. Doom, Thanos, Count Nefaria, and the Masters of Evil have traded blows with these heroes only for time and again these guardians to come out on top. Listed below are those considered the best of the many heroes to count themselves among the Avengers.

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Through the Ages: Transition in Comics – Part Two

Posted by on Apr 27, 2012 in Comic Art News | 0 comments

Through the Ages: Transition in Comics – Part Two by Jerry Whitworth

(see Part One here if you haven’t already)

BRONZE AGE

Amazing Spider-Man #96

Amazing Spider-Man #96

Comic publishing continued on, but stories about colorful superheroes swooping down to save the day, which was already considered childish, seemed even more out of place during the end of the Golden Age and on with protests against the government, the growing recreational drug market, the war on segregation, the spread of venereal disease as soldiers from foreign countries return home to “free love,” the country coming to the end of the witch hunt led by the House Un-American Activities Committee to root out Communism, and a general change in what America was up to that point; about the only place this landscape largely went unnoticed was in comic books (due in no small part to the Comics Code Authority). In the early 1970s, companies DC Comics and Marvel Comics tackled the real world at almost virtually the same time (while within the next decade companies like Dell, Harvey, Gold Key, Warren, and Charlton faded away). Stan Lee and Gil Kane dropped CCA approval for several issues of Amazing Spider-Man when the hero’s best friend (and neglected son of the Green Goblin) Harry Osborn becomes addicted to an unnamed drug after Marvel was approached by the United States Department of Health, Education, and Welfare to raise drug awareness. Spider-Man, dealing with his friend’s downward spiral while Green Goblin hunts him like an animal, forces his nemesis back into reality when he has him confront Harry who’s near-death which shocks him into becoming Norman Osborn again (the success of this arc actually inspired change in the CCA). At DC, the creative team Dennis O’Neil and Neal Adams collaborated on Green Lantern/Green Arrow which had the heroes tackle virtually all the major controversies that divided the nation, beginning with racism and classism and culminating into the emerald duo discovering Green Arrow’s sidekick Speedy addicted to heroin. These stories reflected a change in approach by both companies to storytelling as their worlds became more real and more dangerous.

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Top 10: Rogues Galleries

Posted by on Apr 19, 2012 in Comic Art News | 0 comments

Villains

Villains

Top 10: Rogues Galleries by Jerry Whitworth

For the American comic book, superheroes reign supreme. It doesn’t matter if it’s DC, Marvel, Image, or any of the indies. Throw a cape or mask on someone and you got a much better shot than virtually anything else. But, superheroes are useless without another key component: supervillains. Alien invasions and gangsters are great padding, but we read comics to see colorful characters knocking down buildings or placing loved ones in perilous death traps. Imagine a comic book without a Dr. Doom, Joker, or Lex Luthor or a superhero without some Rogues Gallery, Sinister Six, or Monster Society of Evil to battle him or her. It’s a rather depressing notion because what’s the point of dashing off of rooftops or barreling out of a exploding building if there’s no one to legitimately challenge our hero when they survive? Lets see what villains stand atop all others. Though, before we begin, a little disclaimer: I’m purposely sticking to superheroes. With villains for heroes like James Bond, Doctor Who, and Dick Tracy, the list would be too challenging for me to cut to ten.

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