Posts Tagged "JLA"

Top 10: Heroes We Want in Arrow/Flash

Posted by on Sep 5, 2014 in Comic Art News | 0 comments

Arrow ClanTop 10: Heroes We Want in Arrow/Flash by Jerry Whitworth

 

As the DC Television Universe expands with the upcoming The Flash, fans have started speculating about a possible Justice League of America for Arrow and its new sister series. Arrow has thus far introduced Green Arrow, Huntress, Black Canary, and Roy Harper (who will transition into Arsenal in the upcoming season) and is set to introduce the Atom, Katana, Wildcat, and Manhunter. Of course, Barry Allen would emerge in Starling City last season and will go on to become the Flash as he will later be joined by Firestorm and a not-so-villainous Plastique (perhaps with shades of the Flash character Peek-A-Boo or the Human Bomb). A Justice League film franchise is currently in the works with Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice set to include Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Aquaman, and Cyborg, so it’s unlikely those characters would be available to the TV version especially following the announcement the film and TV universes will be kept separate. Further, as Constantine will be on a separate network and a Justice League Dark film is being planned, magic heroes are likely unavailable (if not, Jason Blood/Etrigan the Demon would have made this list). Previously, we posted about a possible Outsiders expansion with Katana, Black Lightning, Question, and Creeper so those incredible characters will be kept out of the running to keep from being redundant (otherwise, the latter three would occupy three spots). With that, lets take a look who we want to see come to the DC Television Universe.

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Heart of Justice – The Manhunter from Mars

Posted by on Jun 11, 2014 in Comic Art News | 0 comments

Martian ManhunterHeart of Justice: The Manhunter from Mars by Jerry Whitworth

Writer’s Note: The Idol-Head of Diabolu, a Martian Manhunter blog was invaluable in the creation of this article! Visit them today.

David Goyer, the scribe behind Man of Steel and its sequel Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, recently drew criticism for comments regarding the Martian Manhunter. Painting the character as silly from his name to his modus operandi, the statement heaped even more backlash from fans that panned Man of Steel and decried seemingly every new announcement about the sequel (be it the casting of actors like Ben Affleck, Gal Gadot, and Jesse Eisenberg to the very title of the upcoming film). Several sites have cited part of the problems with Man of Steel and choices made about its sequel could come from a lack of understanding of the source material, the statement given by Goyer another in a series from the scribe and director Zack Snyder that may have some basis for the claim. Considered somewhat less than an A-list character, lets take a look at the Manhunter from Mars.

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Review: JLA Adventures: Trapped in Time

Posted by on Feb 22, 2014 in Comic Art News | 0 comments

JLA Adventures: Trapped in TimeReview: JLA Adventures: Trapped in Time by Jerry Whitworth

 

Part of some bizarre”stealth release,” JLA Adventures: Trapped in Time is a direct-to-video animated film available only in US brick-and-mortar Target stores released January 2014. Discovered by eagle-eyed fans who learned of the film through a Target store mailer roughly a week before its premier, absolutely no foreword was provided of the film be it an official announcement or from any of those involved making mention of it, its discovered existence largely a happy accident. Even more strange, several of the players behind the hit animated series Avatar: The Last Airbender worked on the film but little mention of this fact has been played up by Warner Bros. In any event, the film’s plot features a quasi-team-up of the Super Friends and Legion of Super-Heroes when a plan by the Legion of Doom goes awry seeing the group’s leader Lex Luthor emerge in the future. Once there, he acquires the means to time travel while uncovering Superman’s secret origin and returns to the past to make sure Superman never came to exist. Following the rogue are Karate Kid and Dawnstar, two applicants for the Legion of Super-Heroes who are responsible for Luthor’s release and who alert the Justice League of America of the coming threat. First, lets examine some of the themes of the film.

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Make It So: DC – The Manga Universe

Posted by on Jul 9, 2013 in Comic Art News | 0 comments

BatmanMake it So: DC The Manga Universe by Matt Eldridge and Jerry Whitworth

 

In 2000, Marvel Comics produced a manga-version of its universe called the Marvel Mangaverse. Featuring the work of various artists including Ben Dunn, founder of Antarctic Press and creator of Ninja High School and Warrior Nun Areala (manga-inspired American comics), the imprint would last for two years with a brief return some time later. However, the relationship between American and Japanese comics existed for some time before this. Osamu Tezuka, referred by Japanese as the god or godfather of manga, was inspired for his field and style by American animation thanks to characters like Felix the Cat and Betty Boop. Other mangaka, or comic creators, would be similarly inspired including Akira Toriyama (who applied several homages to Superman in his works like Dr. Slump and Dragon Ball Z), Katsuhiko Nishijima and Kazumi Shirasaka (who paid homage to Superman, Wonder Woman, and Iron Man in their work Project A-Ko), and Kazuyoshi Katayama and Keiichi Sato (whose work The Big O was inspired by Batman: The Animated Series).

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The Red Planet on the Four-Color Page: Mars in Comics

Posted by on Aug 12, 2012 in Comic Art News | 0 comments

John Carter of Mars

John Carter of Mars

The Red Planet on the Four-Color Page: Mars in Comics by Jerry Whitworth

Recently, NASA landed the Curiosity Rover on the surface of Mars providing a vast resource of information on the “red planet” that we never before had access toward. Man has told tales of the fourth planet from the sun for many years, a medium frequently employed in this way is the comic book. One of the earliest stories applied to the four-color page was from a source predating comic books by several decades. The Barsoom series written by Edgar Rice Burroughs describes Earthman John Carter as he is transported to Mars where he becomes that world’s champion and weds its princess. Created for pulp magazine (one of the chief progenitors to the comic book), Carter’s story would be applied to a comic strip for the Chicago Sun in 1941 but would be published for comic books in 1952 for Dell Comics, 1972 for DC Comics, 1977 (and again in 2012) for Marvel Comics, 1996 for Dark Horse, and 2010 for Dynamite Entertainment.

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Through the Ages: Transition in Comics – Part Three

Posted by on Apr 29, 2012 in Comic Art News | 8 comments

Through the Ages: Transition in Comics – Part Three
by Jerry Whitworth

(see Part One and Part Two here if you haven’t already)

DARK AGE

X-Men #1

X-Men #1

During the Bronze Age, comic books began to make the transition from being sold at newsstands, convenience stores, and supermarkets to a direct market in comic book shops. As people began to stumble upon these stores, they would also discover that comics could be worth quite a profit as some books could be found selling for thousands of dollars. Word would spread and people began seeing comic books as savings bonds, buying and storing them like rare collectibles. Unfortunately, they failed to realize that those books going for thousands got that way because of managing to survive fifty years of being treated as disposable entertainment that was often thrown away or burned (with issues that survived generally being horribly mangled). Still, the industry took advantage, printing issues with multiple covers, sometimes with different cover art, other times with gimmicks like hologram stickers, glow-in-the-dark images, 3-D plastic pop-out items, foldout covers, and more. People were compelled to form “complete sets”, one book notorious for this was Chris Claremont and Jim Lee’s X-Men #1 (1991) which to this day remains the highest grossing single comic of all time making nearly seven million dollars and selling over 8.1 million units (and printed with five unique covers four of which had different versions such as newsstand and direct market editions). The phenomenon was a boon for the industry, with new publishers popping up all over the place and comic companies in many ways couldn’t print enough books. However, as with roller coasters, this success was bound to crash when the people who became collectors realized not only were the conditions not right to make the huge payoff for their investment they believed they would get, but with so much product overproduced, the books they did buy were virtually useless as a collectible because everyone had it. To this day, you can still find comic shops with dozens of copies of X-Men #1 they can’t give away. The comic book industry nearly went out of business again roughly four decades after Wertham and Congress left it crippled.

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Justice League: Origins of Doom

Posted by on Mar 15, 2012 in Comic Art News | 1 comment

Justice League: Origins of Doom

by Jerry Whitworth

Legion of Doom

Click for larger image

The DC Universe animated film Justice League: Doom bears a rather significant distinction: it is the final work in the field of animation for writer Dwayne McDuffie. A visionary that was instrumental in the creation of Milestone Media and story editor for Justice League Unlimited (among many other accolades), McDuffie was a no-nonsense visionary, a brilliant mind in the fields of character development, plot, and script, and a kind and forthright human being. McDuffie died February 2011 due to complications from heart surgery. The film was his third such piece in the series of original animated features from DC Comics having previously written the adaptation of All-Star Superman and Justice League: Crisis on Two Earths.

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